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Green Chemistry Procedure for Binary Phase Manganese Semiconductor Nanomaterials

Details

Project TitleGreen Chemistry Procedure for Binary Phase Manganese Semiconductor Nanomaterials
Track Code2017-031
Short Description

Binary phase manganese containing nanomaterials, using a novel green chemistry procedure.

Abstract

This procedure allows for tuning of both optical properties by altering the semiconductor bandgap or the manganese composition and the magnetic properties, by altering the size and morphology; resulting in the successful production of MnSe, MnS, MnSe:ZnSe:ZnS, or ZnSeS, alloyed nanoparticles (10-50 nm), and quantum dots (2-10 nm). These MnSe particles can be engineered as strong 600 nm absorbers which could potentially replace noble metal nanoparticles used  (solar) absorbers at this and other visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths.

 
Tagsbioimaging, mri, Contrast Agents, drug delivery
 
Posted DateSep 8, 2017 5:42 PM

Researcher

Name
Leisha Marie Armijo

Manager

Name
Melissa Castillo

Background

Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) and luminescent nanoparticles (NP) are of interest for a variety of biomedical applications, including bioimaging, drug targeting, and photodynamic therapy. However, a significant limitation is that highly efficient photoluminescent QDs available commercially contain cadmium. Recent research has focused on cadmium-free QDs, which are anticipated to exhibit significantly lower cytotoxicity. Previous work has focused on InP and ZnO as alternative semiconductor materials for QDs, but these nanoparticles have been shown to be cytotoxic. Accordingly, there is a need for non-toxic QDs.

Colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been proposed for a range of biomedical applications such as magnetic gradient-guided drug carriers for targeted drug delivery, cancer immunotherapy, and MRI contrast agents. Non-toxic magnetic QDs or MNPs with optical properties would provide sufficient benefit to a wide range of biomedical applications. Combining magnetic and optical properties in a single, nontoxic nanocomposite would allow magnetic gradient-guided targeting or magnetic thermotherapy to be visually observed. It would also allow for the combination of thermo- and photodynamic cancer therapies and drug delivery in a single nanocomposite. Numerous other applications in LEDs and electronics also exist.

Technology Description

A researcher at the University of New Mexico has produced binary phase manganese containing nanomaterials, using a novel green chemistry procedure. This procedure allows for tuning of both optical properties by altering the semiconductor bandgap or the manganese composition and the magnetic properties, by altering the size and morphology; resulting in the successful production of MnSe, MnS, MnSe:ZnSe:ZnS, or ZnSeS, alloyed nanoparticles (10-50 nm), and quantum dots (2-10 nm). These MnSe particles can be engineered as strong 600 nm absorbers which could potentially replace noble metal nanoparticles used  (solar) absorbers at this and other visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths.

Advantages/Applications

  • Significantly lower cytotoxicity compared to other materials
  • Possible replacement for gold and silver nanoparticles
  • Highly magnetic and monodisperse with excellent crystallinity
  • Provides high quantum efficiency (~40%) and ideal color tunability
  • Allows for diagnosis with the option to instantly administer treatment (via thermotherapy, phototherapy, drug delivery, etc.)
  • Applications in bioimaging, targeted contrast agents in MRI, drug targeting, drug delivery, magnetic field-guided transport, thermotherapy, and photodynamic therapy

INQUIRES

STC has filed intellectual property on this exciting new technology and is currently exploring commercialization options. If you are interested in information about this or other technologies, please contact Arlene Mirabal at amirabal@stc.unm.edu or 505-272-7886.